Dance Studio Business Plan Template

Wednesday, May 20th 2020. | Sample Templates

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A polymath of Modernism: Sophie Taeuber-Arp at Tate Modern

Sophie Taeuber-Arp was a polymath of Modernism. Her retrospective at Tate Modern, the first in the UK, spotlights her genius across hundreds of works – from gouache on paper, beaded bags, cross-stitched cushions, sculptural reliefs and stained glass, to architecture and interior design.

There is a consistent clarity to Taeuber-Arp’s multifaceted oeuvre, an enquiring abstraction, ahead of its time, that dissolves the arbitrary but contested line between high art and craft. Her traversing of traditionally gendered disciplines attests to her being a powerful independent force of the interwar European avant-garde. Yet her influence and legacy have been woefully undercelebrated until now.

The exhibition’s first room (a slightly awkward corridor space – perhaps an unfortunate quirk of Herzog & de Meuron’s Blavatnik building) orientates the visitor in her life and times. Born Sophie Taeuber in 1889 in Davos, Switzerland, from 1910 she studied fine and applied arts in Munich at an Arts and Crafts-influenced school.

At the outbreak of war in 1914 she moved to Zurich and experimented with nonfigurative art, inspired by grid structures of textiles. Emerging into an impressive gallery with deep red and blue walls, you encounter the Vertical-Horizontal series which demonstrate Taeuber-Arp’s pioneering abstract language of modular colour sequences.

Sophie Taeuber-Arp. Embroidery c. 1920. Wool on canvas.

Source:Private collection, on loan to the Fondation Arp, Clamart, France

A student of expressive dance, she performed at Zurich’s Cabaret Voltaire – home of the Dada movement. The influence of Dada is clear in 17 marionettes suspended in animated movement that Taeuber-Arp made for the 1918 adaptation of Carlo Gozzi’s play King Stag – cancelled after three performances due to Spanish flu. The striking geometric forms and bright colours of the turned-wood figures are individualised with materials ranging from delicate fabric flowers on Smeraldina, to the cut brass horns of White Stag. The Guards is a sci-fi Cerberus with five heads, silver legs, and arms flailing – the multitude lending itself to a blur of movement and the evocation of rhythmic bodily motion through space that is palpable across her work.

The second major gallery is devoted to ‘abstraction in three dimensions’ and her contribution to architecture and interior design. As a student in 1911, Taeuber-Arp told her sister ‘Furnishing rooms for an architect … is what appeals to me most.’ By the 1920s she surpassed this wish and became the architect herself. A polymath of Modernism: Sophie Taeuber-Arp at Tate Modern

Sophie Taeuber-Arp was a polymath of Modernism. Her retrospective at Tate Modern, the first in the UK, spotlights her genius across hundreds of works – from gouache on paper, beaded bags, cross-stitched cushions, sculptural reliefs and stained glass, to architecture and interior design.

There is a consistent clarity to Taeuber-Arp’s multifaceted oeuvre, an enquiring abstraction, ahead of its time, that dissolves the arbitrary but contested line between high art and craft. Her traversing of traditionally gendered disciplines attests to her being a powerful independent force of the interwar European avant-garde. Yet her influence and legacy have been woefully undercelebrated until now.

The exhibition’s first room (a slightly awkward corridor space – perhaps an unfortunate quirk of Herzog & de Meuron’s Blavatnik building) orientates the visitor in her life and times. Born Sophie Taeuber in 1889 in Davos, Switzerland, from 1910 she studied fine and applied arts in Munich at an Arts and Crafts-influenced school.

At the outbreak of war in 1914 she moved to Zurich and experimented with nonfigurative art, inspired by grid structures of textiles. Emerging into an impressive gallery with deep red and blue walls, you encounter the Vertical-Horizontal series which demonstrate Taeuber-Arp’s pioneering abstract language of modular colour sequences.

Sophie Taeuber-Arp. Embroidery c. 1920. Wool on canvas.

Source:Private collection, on loan to the Fondation Arp, Clamart, France

A student of expressive dance, she performed at Zurich’s Cabaret Voltaire – home of the Dada movement. The influence of Dada is clear in 17 marionettes suspended in animated movement that Taeuber-Arp made for the 1918 adaptation of Carlo Gozzi’s play King Stag – cancelled after three performances due to Spanish flu. The striking geometric forms and bright colours of the turned-wood figures are individualised with materials ranging from delicate fabric flowers on Smeraldina, to the cut brass horns of White Stag. The Guards is a sci-fi Cerberus with five heads, silver legs, and arms flailing – the multitude lending itself to a blur of movement and the evocation of rhythmic bodily motion through space that is palpable across her work.

The second major gallery is devoted to ‘abstraction in three dimensions’ and her contribution to architecture and interior design. As a student in 1911, Taeuber-Arp told her sister ‘Furnishing rooms for an architect … is what appeals to me most.’ By the 1920s she surpassed this wish and became the architect herself. She applies techniques from textile design to architectural drawing – the room plan opened out like a flat garment template

In 1926 she was commissioned to design the interiors of the Aubette, a cultural centre in Strasbourg, with her husband Hans Arp and collaborator Theo von Doesburg. In Aubette 182, 1927, she applies techniques from textile design to architectural drawing – the room plan opened out like a flat garment template, with floors and walls waiting to be folded up into three dimensions.

The gouache Floor of the passageway in the Aubette from a distance is an abstraction of blue, grey, black and white horizons. Closer inspection reveals the artwork as a working document with sums and floorplan scribbles decorating the borders. The completed Aubette, one of the first public modern interiors, was praised by contemporary Emmy Hemmings as ‘a treasure box’ of Taeuber-Arp’s signature abstraction.

After the Aubette’s success, Taeuber-Arp embarked on designing a home and studio in Clamart, outside Paris. The building is a testament to her material sensitivity and amalgamation of craft with precise forms of modernism. Built in local burrstone, the building’s rough, undulating surface is offset by its clean rectangular form and angular cast concrete balconies and entrances. After the couple moved into the house in 1929, Taeuber-Arp updated her business card to advertise herself as ‘architect’. She applies techniques from textile design to architectural drawing – the room plan opened out like a flat garment template

In 1926 she was commissioned to design the interiors of the Aubette, a cultural centre in Strasbourg, with her husband Hans Arp and collaborator Theo von Doesburg. In Aubette 182, 1927, she applies techniques from textile design to architectural drawing – the room plan opened out like a flat garment template, with floors and walls waiting to be folded up into three dimensions.

The gouache Floor of the passageway in the Aubette from a distance is an abstraction of blue, grey, black and white horizons. Closer inspection reveals the artwork as a working document with sums and floorplan scribbles decorating the borders. The completed Aubette, one of the first public modern interiors, was praised by contemporary Emmy Hemmings as ‘a treasure box’ of Taeuber-Arp’s signature abstraction.

After the Aubette’s success, Taeuber-Arp embarked on designing a home and studio in Clamart, outside Paris. The building is a testament to her material sensitivity and amalgamation of craft with precise forms of modernism. Built in local burrstone, the building’s rough, undulating surface is offset by its clean rectangular form and angular cast concrete balconies and entrances. After the couple moved into the house in 1929, Taeuber-Arp updated her business card to advertise herself as ‘architect’. The exhibition coincides with a welcome move by museums to celebrate artists who were neglected for male contemporaries

The house, now the Fondation Arp, is represented by a large wall print hung behind original furniture Taeuber-Arp created for the holistic project. The wooden drawers and stackable shelves in bright blue, yellow, and grey show a design approach of rational functionality, with joy expressed in colour and handle details. The exhibition’s smooth thematic arrangement reveals how Taeuber-Arp’s work evolved throughout her lifetime, inspired contemporaries from Duchamp to Kandinsky, and reflected the turbulence of the era. During exile from occupied France, she worked in easily transportable materials and the 1942 Geometric Constructions – bold ink circles on paper – are remarkable precursors to 1960s Op Art. Shortly after they were made, in January 1943, Taeuber-Arp died from accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. She was 53.

The exhibition coincides with a welcome move by museums to celebrate artists who slipped through the cracks of a canon with no recognition of applied arts, or who were neglected for male contemporaries. With all the Tate’s major shows this year devoted to women artists – from Paula Rego to Lubaina Himid – the public can encounter legends living and lost.

In 1937 Sophie Taeuber-Arp wrote ‘Something to which I attribute great value […] is gaiety. It allows us to have no fear before the problems of life.’ This stirring sentiment is certainly evident throughout the rhythmic work of this timely show.

Sophie Taeuber-Arp is at Tate Modern until 17 October 2021 The exhibition coincides with a welcome move by museums to celebrate artists who were neglected for male contemporaries

The house, now the Fondation Arp, is represented by a large wall print hung behind original furniture Taeuber-Arp created for the holistic project. The wooden drawers and stackable shelves in bright blue, yellow, and grey show a design approach of rational functionality, with joy expressed in colour and handle details. The exhibition’s smooth thematic arrangement reveals how Taeuber-Arp’s work evolved throughout her lifetime, inspired contemporaries from Duchamp to Kandinsky, and reflected the turbulence of the era. During exile from occupied France, she worked in easily transportable materials and the 1942 Geometric Constructions – bold ink circles on paper – are remarkable precursors to 1960s Op Art. Shortly after they were made, in January 1943, Taeuber-Arp died from accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. She was 53.

The exhibition coincides with a welcome move by museums to celebrate artists who slipped through the cracks of a canon with no recognition of applied arts, or who were neglected for male contemporaries. With all the Tate’s major shows this year devoted to women artists – from Paula Rego to Lubaina Himid – the public can encounter legends living and lost.

In 1937 Sophie Taeuber-Arp wrote ‘Something to which I attribute great value […] is gaiety. It allows us to have no fear before the problems of life.’ This stirring sentiment is certainly evident throughout the rhythmic work of this timely show.

Sophie Taeuber-Arp is at Tate Modern until 17 October 2021

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