Performance Improvement Plan Template

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A Design Thinking Roadmap for Process Improvement and Organizational Change Key Takeaways Design thinking is a process to quickly discover problems, prioritize the top challenges that the organizational change effort needs to address, and create ideas for solutions. A successful organizational change effort needs to connect the perspectives of the entire workforce at all levels (from the front-line workers to the executive leadership).  Use an incremental design thinking approach to create a common vision for the change effort. Perform small targeted design thinking workshops with specific groups in the organization to understand the problems and potential solutions, and then have a large workshop with members of all segments of the organization to create solutions that work for the entire organization. Support the design thinking approach with other techniques such as the Lean Startup Mission Model Canvas and Stakeholder Value Proposition Canvas to consolidate and visualize the information to make it easier for others to see the problem-solution mapping. Turn recommendations into an action plan for change. Create a backlog of tasks that provide a clear implementation path of the change activities as a way to ensure the change effort does not stop after recommendations are provided. A Design Thinking Roadmap for Process Improvement and Organizational Change Key Takeaways Design thinking is a process to quickly discover problems, prioritize the top challenges that the organizational change effort needs to address, and create ideas for solutions. A successful organizational change effort needs to connect the perspectives of the entire workforce at all levels (from the front-line workers to the executive leadership).  Use an incremental design thinking approach to create a common vision for the change effort. Perform small targeted design thinking workshops with specific groups in the organization to understand the problems and potential solutions, and then have a large workshop with members of all segments of the organization to create solutions that work for the entire organization. Support the design thinking approach with other techniques such as the Lean Startup Mission Model Canvas and Stakeholder Value Proposition Canvas to consolidate and visualize the information to make it easier for others to see the problem-solution mapping. Turn recommendations into an action plan for change. Create a backlog of tasks that provide a clear implementation path of the change activities as a way to ensure the change effort does not stop after recommendations are provided. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Engineering and Technology Directorate (ETD) is a key contributor to a cross-organizational proposal development process (in this article, referred as the proposal process), where the organization provides engineering concepts and cost estimates for new projects. The GSFC proposal process is one of many mechanisms used by the various NASA Centers to propose new science, engineering, and technology concepts to attain funding from the NASA headquarters to develop new technologies that advance the NASA mission. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Engineering and Technology Directorate (ETD) is a key contributor to a cross-organizational proposal development process (in this article, referred as the proposal process), where the organization provides engineering concepts and cost estimates for new projects. The GSFC proposal process is one of many mechanisms used by the various NASA Centers to propose new science, engineering, and technology concepts to attain funding from the NASA headquarters to develop new technologies that advance the NASA mission. As part of the proposal process, ETD designs feasible engineering concepts and develops cost estimates that are included in the proposals that are sent forward to compete for funding for implementation. Through the proposals, each NASA Center competes against proposals developed by private industry for the same science concepts, and they also compete against other science concept proposals developed by other NASA Centers. ETD’s engagement in the proposal process takes from 12 to 18 months, with multiple proposals being worked simultaneously at different stages of the process. As part of the proposal process, ETD designs feasible engineering concepts and develops cost estimates that are included in the proposals that are sent forward to compete for funding for implementation. Through the proposals, each NASA Center competes against proposals developed by private industry for the same science concepts, and they also compete against other science concept proposals developed by other NASA Centers. ETD’s engagement in the proposal process takes from 12 to 18 months, with multiple proposals being worked simultaneously at different stages of the process. For years, the ETD organization faced the challenges of providing timely engineering support to the proposal process. This is a result of the constantly changing nature of the scientific and technology environment, competing ETD internal and GSFC priorities, the nature of its evolving workforce where people change jobs based on their career goals and the limited resources of the organization. For a long time, the organization felt like a victim of the process and believed they could not effect changes to improve the proposal process. Participation in the process was often perceived as a burden for some, and not something everyone enjoyed because of the low return on investment. For years, the ETD organization faced the challenges of providing timely engineering support to the proposal process. This is a result of the constantly changing nature of the scientific and technology environment, competing ETD internal and GSFC priorities, the nature of its evolving workforce where people change jobs based on their career goals and the limited resources of the organization. For a long time, the organization felt like a victim of the process and believed they could not effect changes to improve the proposal process. Participation in the process was often perceived as a burden for some, and not something everyone enjoyed because of the low return on investment. As a systems engineer working in the Department of Defense (DoD) for 18 years, I took a career broadening assignment to work at GSFC for one year, leading a change initiative for ETD in the context of the GSFC proposal process. The change initiative impacted over 1,200 employees and transformed the organization’s role in the GSFC proposal process. During that year, I had to find creative ways to understand the organization and the problem they wanted to improve, find solutions to problems, and provide feasible and high value recommendations that would significantly transform how the organization operated for many years. At the end of my one-year assignment, I provided valuable recommendations to the organization that improved their participation in the proposal process, and changed the dynamics in the organization, creating the foundation for a new organizational culture.  As a systems engineer working in the Department of Defense (DoD) for 18 years, I took a career broadening assignment to work at GSFC for one year, leading a change initiative for ETD in the context of the GSFC proposal process. The change initiative impacted over 1,200 employees and transformed the organization’s role in the GSFC proposal process. During that year, I had to find creative ways to understand the organization and the problem they wanted to improve, find solutions to problems, and provide feasible and high value recommendations that would significantly transform how the organization operated for many years. At the end of my one-year assignment, I provided valuable recommendations to the organization that improved their participation in the proposal process, and changed the dynamics in the organization, creating the foundation for a new organizational culture.  In this article I will share the design thinking techniques I used to drive organizational change and process improvement, and to create an impact on the organization.  The Need for Change In this article I will share the design thinking techniques I used to drive organizational change and process improvement, and to create an impact on the organization.  The Need for Change Proposals begin by principal investigators devising an idea for a new science concept. After months of maturing the science concept, the engineering (ETD) organization is called to provide feasible engineering concepts within the prescribed cost and technology constraints. Often the engineering organization was asked to provide engineering expertise too late in the process (i.e. six months before the proposal due date). Over time this approach became a burden on the organization.  Proposals begin by principal investigators devising an idea for a new science concept. After months of maturing the science concept, the engineering (ETD) organization is called to provide feasible engineering concepts within the prescribed cost and technology constraints. Often the engineering organization was asked to provide engineering expertise too late in the process (i.e. six months before the proposal due date). Over time this approach became a burden on the organization.  In order to support the proposal work, people had to manage multiple priorities at the same time. Engineers had to divide their time between working proposals and providing support to their regular engineering projects.  In order to support the proposal work, people had to manage multiple priorities at the same time. Engineers had to divide their time between working proposals and providing support to their regular engineering projects.  On top of the engineering work that needed to be done, managers in the organization were constantly challenged by having to shuffle the limited resources they had to do the work to be able to meet the various timelines and priorities of the organization. This became more challenging given that some members of the engineering team did not want to work on the proposals, given that it involved months of hard work with a low proposal winning rate. In addition, since proposal work is competition-sensitive, knowledge was never shared between proposals or among proposal teams, which sometimes resulted in duplication of work and a lack of sharing of lessons learned amongst teams. By not having access to previous proposal work, teams could not reuse previous cost estimates or previous designs. On top of the engineering work that needed to be done, managers in the organization were constantly challenged by having to shuffle the limited resources they had to do the work to be able to meet the various timelines and priorities of the organization. This became more challenging given that some members of the engineering team did not want to work on the proposals, given that it involved months of hard work with a low proposal winning rate. In addition, since proposal work is competition-sensitive, knowledge was never shared between proposals or among proposal teams, which sometimes resulted in duplication of work and a lack of sharing of lessons learned amongst teams. By not having access to previous proposal work, teams could not reuse previous cost estimates or previous designs. With the change initiative, ETD was looking for new ways of doing work to improve their ability to deliver robust engineering concepts for the proposals that could increase the proposal winning rate for GSFC. By increasing the proposal win rate, they could receive additional funding for development of new technology and new projects in the organization.  With the change initiative, ETD was looking for new ways of doing work to improve their ability to deliver robust engineering concepts for the proposals that could increase the proposal winning rate for GSFC. By increasing the proposal win rate, they could receive additional funding for development of new technology and new projects in the organization. 

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