Printable Map Of Europe

Wednesday, March 11th 2020. | Sample Templates

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For the Biggest Multilateral Challenges Global Leadership Is in Short Supply For the Biggest Multilateral Challenges Global Leadership Is in Short Supply t is the more unusual or indecorous moments in UN General Assembly history that are best remembered. Venezuelan strongman Hugo Chavez once whiffed that the podium “smells of sulfur,” comparing George W. Bush to the devil. More recently, former U.S. President Donald Trump drew chuckles when boasting of “accomplishing more than almost any administration” in U.S. history. t is the more unusual or indecorous moments in UN General Assembly history that are best remembered. Venezuelan strongman Hugo Chavez once whiffed that the podium “smells of sulfur,” comparing George W. Bush to the devil. More recently, former U.S. President Donald Trump drew chuckles when boasting of “accomplishing more than almost any administration” in U.S. history. While we do not know yet whether similarly memorable pronouncements will take place this year, the forum’s role to advance and attract support for global policy remains unique. Persuasive leadership is needed to catalyze collective action on issues that are impossible for any state, or small collection of states, to confront on their own. While we do not know yet whether similarly memorable pronouncements will take place this year, the forum’s role to advance and attract support for global policy remains unique. Persuasive leadership is needed to catalyze collective action on issues that are impossible for any state, or small collection of states, to confront on their own. Unfortunately, on the most critical near- and long-term challenges—overcoming the pandemic, strengthening the state of democratic governance across the world, and curbing climate change—robust global leadership remains in short supply. Unfortunately, on the most critical near- and long-term challenges—overcoming the pandemic, strengthening the state of democratic governance across the world, and curbing climate change—robust global leadership remains in short supply. With good reason, the campaign against COVID-19 will dominate the plenary. With most rich countries having vaccinated large segments of their populations, the focus must shift to ensuring developing states are able to begin en masse inoculations. This is made difficult given that advanced countries have already reserved large portions of the current supply and future production, significantly hindering vaccine distribution efforts such as COVAX. Today, fewer than 3% of Africans have received their first dose of vaccine while tremendous supplies sit in reserve for vaccine skeptic Westerners. With good reason, the campaign against COVID-19 will dominate the plenary. With most rich countries having vaccinated large segments of their populations, the focus must shift to ensuring developing states are able to begin en masse inoculations. This is made difficult given that advanced countries have already reserved large portions of the current supply and future production, significantly hindering vaccine distribution efforts such as COVAX. Today, fewer than 3% of Africans have received their first dose of vaccine while tremendous supplies sit in reserve for vaccine skeptic Westerners. To date, the U.S. has pledged to donate more than 580 million doses—a considerable amount, though short of the 11 billion doses needed to eradicate the pandemic. While the U.S. commitment is more than China or Russia have offered, those countries’ state-developed jabs—while less effective than Western variants—have reached countries unable to procure the gold-standard shots. In an instance of diplomatic one-upmanship, China announced a two million dose pledge to Vietnam hours before Vice President Kamala Harris was set to announce a one million contribution. Vaccines have become not only vehicles for public health, but instruments of strategic aid. To date, the U.S. has pledged to donate more than 580 million doses—a considerable amount, though short of the 11 billion doses needed to eradicate the pandemic. While the U.S. commitment is more than China or Russia have offered, those countries’ state-developed jabs—while less effective than Western variants—have reached countries unable to procure the gold-standard shots. In an instance of diplomatic one-upmanship, China announced a two million dose pledge to Vietnam hours before Vice President Kamala Harris was set to announce a one million contribution. Vaccines have become not only vehicles for public health, but instruments of strategic aid. Vaccine pledges will not be the only topic of discussion. Pharma companies are facing pressure to transfer vaccine know-how to manufacturers in poorer countries. There will also be debate on global vaccine certifications to replace the current country-by-country patchwork. Ultimately, more robust universal frameworks and distribution mechanisms are needed. Concrete action is not merely good diplomacy or charity but calculated self-interest; new strains will continue to eclipse vaccine immunity until tackled on a global scale. That goal, at this juncture, still remains largely theoretical. Vaccine pledges will not be the only topic of discussion. Pharma companies are facing pressure to transfer vaccine know-how to manufacturers in poorer countries. There will also be debate on global vaccine certifications to replace the current country-by-country patchwork. Ultimately, more robust universal frameworks and distribution mechanisms are needed. Concrete action is not merely good diplomacy or charity but calculated self-interest; new strains will continue to eclipse vaccine immunity until tackled on a global scale. That goal, at this juncture, still remains largely theoretical. The pandemic has magnified the discontent many feel about their country’s governance. Polling suggests that citizens across the world continue to lose trust in their governments. Early rally-around-the-flag effects buoyed national leadership at the earliest stages of the pandemic, but has given way to lingering dissatisfactions that predate the current crisis. Regions as varied as Central America, Southeast Asia, and Eastern Europe have suffered democratic backsliding. Freedom House announced that in 2021 “nearly 75% of the world’s population lived in a country that faced [political rights] deterioration.” It seems that Jair Bolsonaro’s notion that “only God will get me out” of the president’s chair is a general fear likely felt not only by Brazilians. The pandemic has magnified the discontent many feel about their country’s governance. Polling suggests that citizens across the world continue to lose trust in their governments. Early rally-around-the-flag effects buoyed national leadership at the earliest stages of the pandemic, but has given way to lingering dissatisfactions that predate the current crisis. Regions as varied as Central America, Southeast Asia, and Eastern Europe have suffered democratic backsliding. Freedom House announced that in 2021 “nearly 75% of the world’s population lived in a country that faced [political rights] deterioration.” It seems that Jair Bolsonaro’s notion that “only God will get me out” of the president’s chair is a general fear likely felt not only by Brazilians. While this overall trend is negative, there are few indications that the U.S. or the European bloc will make governance and democracy reform a central pillar of foreign engagement in the near-term. On the heels of withdrawal from Afghanistan, U.S. leaders are focused domestically; Gallup polling suggests Americans view foreign affairs as far less important relative to the economy, immigration, and race relations. Meanwhile, Europe is navigating the delicate challenge of illiberal governments and rising political parties among the Union’s own member states, as well as diverse risks in its near-abroad—tempering focus to a narrower set of interests. While this overall trend is negative, there are few indications that the U.S. or the European bloc will make governance and democracy reform a central pillar of foreign engagement in the near-term. On the heels of withdrawal from Afghanistan, U.S. leaders are focused domestically; Gallup polling suggests Americans view foreign affairs as far less important relative to the economy, immigration, and race relations. Meanwhile, Europe is navigating the delicate challenge of illiberal governments and rising political parties among the Union’s own member states, as well as diverse risks in its near-abroad—tempering focus to a narrower set of interests. China will also be taking a standoff approach to reform—though for different reasons. Advocating non-interference, China will continue to foster relations disconnected from any governance or human rights measures. Worryingly, Chinese companies also continue to export cutting-edge surveillance technology. This makes it easier for countries with poor civic protections to mete out repressive control. China will also be taking a standoff approach to reform—though for different reasons. Advocating non-interference, China will continue to foster relations disconnected from any governance or human rights measures. Worryingly, Chinese companies also continue to export cutting-edge surveillance technology. This makes it easier for countries with poor civic protections to mete out repressive control.

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