Sales order form Template

Friday, January 8th 2021. | Sample Templates

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How 99-year old small family soap business Caurnie is scrubbing up for its digital future How 99-year old small family soap business Caurnie is scrubbing up for its digital future When the pandemic hit, Caurnie Soaperie, a small business operating out of Kirkintilloch in Scotland, wasn’t prepared. With its traditional sales channels limited, it needed to move into the digital age – and fast. With help from a crack team of global marketing experts, Caurnie was presented with tools and strategies to give it a digital, packaging and e-commerce roadmap to its digital future – but was it enough to help Caurnie out of the soapy bubble? When the pandemic hit, Caurnie Soaperie, a small business operating out of Kirkintilloch in Scotland, wasn’t prepared. With its traditional sales channels limited, it needed to move into the digital age – and fast. With help from a crack team of global marketing experts, Caurnie was presented with tools and strategies to give it a digital, packaging and e-commerce roadmap to its digital future – but was it enough to help Caurnie out of the soapy bubble? Caurnie Soaperie is a 99-year-old vegan soaperie known for making a variety of skincare and haircare products, ranging from bodywash and shampoo to conditioner and moisturizer. From its headquarters in Kirkintilloch, Scotland, the small family-owned business is unique in that it uses only locally grown or foraged plants to produce small batches of products using original antique equipment. Caurnie Soaperie is a 99-year-old vegan soaperie known for making a variety of skincare and haircare products, ranging from bodywash and shampoo to conditioner and moisturizer. From its headquarters in Kirkintilloch, Scotland, the small family-owned business is unique in that it uses only locally grown or foraged plants to produce small batches of products using original antique equipment. The company was established in 1922 and has a rich family legacy that has been carried on by the founder’s grandson, Jim Little, owner of Caurnie Soaperie. Historically, the brand has never had much competition to contend with, but with the soap market becoming more saturated, Little believes that “Caurnie has always been doing things that are well-thought-out and different.” He says: “I’ve found success in having something that’s a good design, not just a cut and paste of somebody else’s stuff plastered with my brand on it.” The company was established in 1922 and has a rich family legacy that has been carried on by the founder’s grandson, Jim Little, owner of Caurnie Soaperie. Historically, the brand has never had much competition to contend with, but with the soap market becoming more saturated, Little believes that “Caurnie has always been doing things that are well-thought-out and different.” He says: “I’ve found success in having something that’s a good design, not just a cut and paste of somebody else’s stuff plastered with my brand on it.” With ambitions to become a globally-recognized brand, Little is fully aware that the current set-up of the business is a far cry from the frictionless experience that will help him reach this goal. The website, ease of packaging and fulfilment of customer orders are challenges that he needs to address. With ambitions to become a globally-recognized brand, Little is fully aware that the current set-up of the business is a far cry from the frictionless experience that will help him reach this goal. The website, ease of packaging and fulfilment of customer orders are challenges that he needs to address. “The website is one of my total weaknesses – it’s very hard to navigate and not the way I’d like to see it,” says Little. “The reason I haven’t been addressing these issues [is because] I’ve been approaching it in little bits rather than giving it proper attention. That’s why it’s all over the place. There’s loads of friction in the way I do business, it’s not smooth – and my aim is to be frictionless.” Pandemic problems “The website is one of my total weaknesses – it’s very hard to navigate and not the way I’d like to see it,” says Little. “The reason I haven’t been addressing these issues [is because] I’ve been approaching it in little bits rather than giving it proper attention. That’s why it’s all over the place. There’s loads of friction in the way I do business, it’s not smooth – and my aim is to be frictionless.” Pandemic problems Before the pandemic, Caurnie relied solely on its basic website and having a physical presence at farmer’s markets to sell products. With pandemic lockdowns cutting off its main route to market, it needed to find new ways of doing business – it needed to go digital. Before the pandemic, Caurnie relied solely on its basic website and having a physical presence at farmer’s markets to sell products. With pandemic lockdowns cutting off its main route to market, it needed to find new ways of doing business – it needed to go digital. So, as part of The Drum’s ‘Marketing can change the world’ global initiative, Meta (Facebook) and a crack team of digital experts set out to transform Caurnie and equip the business with knowledge and access to digital tools that would help bring it into the modern age. So, as part of The Drum’s ‘Marketing can change the world’ global initiative, Meta (Facebook) and a crack team of digital experts set out to transform Caurnie and equip the business with knowledge and access to digital tools that would help bring it into the modern age. The team, led by Natasha Chetiyawardana, creative partner and founder, Bow & Arrow (part of Accenture Interactive), included: Shayne Cuffy, experience lead, VMLY&R – Healthcare & Pharmaceuticals; Mel Henson, head of business strategy and creative, OptimiZion; Stuart Gilmour, owner, Stand; Cassandra Stevens, global head of commerce, Publicis Commerce; Srija Chatterjee, global marketing director, Dole Sunshine Company; and Cameron Worth, chief creative officer, SharpEnd. The team, led by Natasha Chetiyawardana, creative partner and founder, Bow & Arrow (part of Accenture Interactive), included: Shayne Cuffy, experience lead, VMLY&R – Healthcare & Pharmaceuticals; Mel Henson, head of business strategy and creative, OptimiZion; Stuart Gilmour, owner, Stand; Cassandra Stevens, global head of commerce, Publicis Commerce; Srija Chatterjee, global marketing director, Dole Sunshine Company; and Cameron Worth, chief creative officer, SharpEnd. The goal for the team was ambitious: to develop world-class, yet practical, low-cost digital marketing initiatives to help the brand reduce friction and increase sales. Working together with Little, they embarked on a comprehensive review of the business and competitive environment, assessed the opportunities and challenges, and developed a marketing strategy for Caurnie. The goal for the team was ambitious: to develop world-class, yet practical, low-cost digital marketing initiatives to help the brand reduce friction and increase sales. Working together with Little, they embarked on a comprehensive review of the business and competitive environment, assessed the opportunities and challenges, and developed a marketing strategy for Caurnie.

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