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Monday, January 20th 2020. | Sample Templates

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How to make 3d snowflake from paper (free template) – Papershape from Snowflakes Templates, source:Papershape
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Paper Snowflake Pattern Template: How to make a paper snowflake. from Snowflakes Templates, source:KinderArt
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How To Make Paper Snowflakes – pattern templates – Easy Peasy and Fun from Snowflakes Templates, source:Easy Peasy and Fun
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Snowflake Templates (free printables) – The Best Ideas for Kids from Snowflakes Templates, source:The Best Ideas for Kids
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It’s Snowing Star Wars! 10 new DIY Star Wars Paper Snowflake … from Snowflakes Templates, source:If It’s Hip, It’s Here
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Paper Snowflake Templates Free Printable Templates & Coloring … from Snowflakes Templates, source:FirstPalette.com
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Snowflake Line Icon Vector Isolated Elements Set Of Vector … from Snowflakes Templates, source:iStock
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Printable Snowflake Templates – Play Nintendo. from Snowflakes Templates, source:Play Nintendo

Wildfires are getting bigger every year Wildfires are getting bigger every year Brown skies and red sunsets. Ash falling from the sky like snowflakes. Smoke traveling from California to New York. Wildfires in California have become a seasonal phenomenon that seems to grow by the year. Brown skies and red sunsets. Ash falling from the sky like snowflakes. Smoke traveling from California to New York. Wildfires in California have become a seasonal phenomenon that seems to grow by the year. Drought, heat, changing weather patterns, encroachment into the so-called urban wildland interface — all these are factors have changed the fundamental nature of fires, management and suppression in California. Drought, heat, changing weather patterns, encroachment into the so-called urban wildland interface — all these are factors have changed the fundamental nature of fires, management and suppression in California. To help residents, groups like Ready OC, Orange County’s emergency preparedness resource, stand in the gap with vital information.Consider: Since California started recording fire incidents in 1932, the 10 worst fire seasons have happened since 2000 In 2020, more than 4.4 million acres burned The seven largest wildfires in California have all occurred since 2018 This year’s still-burning Dixie Fire at 963,000 acres ranks No. 2 behind last year’s August Complex Fire To help residents, groups like Ready OC, Orange County’s emergency preparedness resource, stand in the gap with vital information.Consider: Since California started recording fire incidents in 1932, the 10 worst fire seasons have happened since 2000 In 2020, more than 4.4 million acres burned The seven largest wildfires in California have all occurred since 2018 This year’s still-burning Dixie Fire at 963,000 acres ranks No. 2 behind last year’s August Complex Fire As part of National Preparedness Month and in preparation for National Fire Prevention Week, Behind the Badge connected with Fire Chief Brian Fennessy of the Orange County Fire Authority, who provided written responses to questions about wildfire and preparedness. Chief Brian Fennessy. Photo courtesy of the Orange County Fire Authority As part of National Preparedness Month and in preparation for National Fire Prevention Week, Behind the Badge connected with Fire Chief Brian Fennessy of the Orange County Fire Authority, who provided written responses to questions about wildfire and preparedness. Chief Brian Fennessy. Photo courtesy of the Orange County Fire Authority What are the most important things you can do to be fire aware and fire ready? What are the most important things you can do to be fire aware and fire ready? The most important first step to take is to make sure that you and your family are prepared to evacuate early in the event of a wildfire.Put together a disaster preparedness kit with enough essential supplies to last each family member at least three days – and don’t forget about your pets! You can also take some steps to ensure that your home is ready and hardened in case a fire does approach your community. Ensure that you have adequate clearance between your home and vegetation or combustible materials, as well as making sure the exterior of the house itself is not comprised of combustible materials. Home hardening can save your home from a wildfire as it did to many homes in the most recent wildfires here in Orange County.The OCFA offers a free home assessment program. Fire prevention staff will come out and assess your level of risk.For more information and other resources, visit www.ocfa.org/rsg.Watch: A view from a fire helicopter: IMG_4015What are the most important and/or innovative things OCFA does to keep the public aware and engaged?Here in Orange County we know how important it is to keep our communities informed through a variety of channels, especially during an emergency. One of the biggest tools we have is a program called AlertOC, which allows residents to sign up with their cities to receive alerts by phone and email about an emergency affecting a community.We also encourage people to follow our social media accounts (@OCFireAuthority). We post fire safety and other educational material as well as incident information. Firefighters prepare to battle fires during frequent trainings such as the one pictured at the North Net Fire Training Center in 2015. File photo by Steven Georges/Behind the Badge The most important first step to take is to make sure that you and your family are prepared to evacuate early in the event of a wildfire.Put together a disaster preparedness kit with enough essential supplies to last each family member at least three days – and don’t forget about your pets! You can also take some steps to ensure that your home is ready and hardened in case a fire does approach your community. Ensure that you have adequate clearance between your home and vegetation or combustible materials, as well as making sure the exterior of the house itself is not comprised of combustible materials. Home hardening can save your home from a wildfire as it did to many homes in the most recent wildfires here in Orange County.The OCFA offers a free home assessment program. Fire prevention staff will come out and assess your level of risk.For more information and other resources, visit www.ocfa.org/rsg.Watch: A view from a fire helicopter: IMG_4015What are the most important and/or innovative things OCFA does to keep the public aware and engaged?Here in Orange County we know how important it is to keep our communities informed through a variety of channels, especially during an emergency. One of the biggest tools we have is a program called AlertOC, which allows residents to sign up with their cities to receive alerts by phone and email about an emergency affecting a community.We also encourage people to follow our social media accounts (@OCFireAuthority). We post fire safety and other educational material as well as incident information. Firefighters prepare to battle fires during frequent trainings such as the one pictured at the North Net Fire Training Center in 2015. File photo by Steven Georges/Behind the Badge Our education team can come out personally and provide valuable instruction to groups on a variety of topics, including fire safety and disaster preparedness. Check out ocfa.org/SafetyPrograms for details. Our education team can come out personally and provide valuable instruction to groups on a variety of topics, including fire safety and disaster preparedness. Check out ocfa.org/SafetyPrograms for details. That said, waiting to receive a warning is not prudent when you are aware that fire(s) are burning nearby. It’s everyone’s responsibility to stay alert. Turn on the local news, go outside and see if you see or smell smoke, go online, call friends and family. In short, one must take responsibility for remaining aware.Law enforcement and the fire service will do all they can to alert communities, but residents should not wait to be told to evacuate if at all concerned.Why is fire safety and readiness education important?Readiness education is essential because you never know when disaster can strike. Statistics show in the event of an emergency, survival and success favor those who are prepared. This can apply to any emergency, whether it’s a residential structure fire, large wildfire, earthquakes, or even a pandemic.When emergencies do occur, people often have a sense of panic with emotions and adrenaline levels running high – this is NOT the time to come up with a plan. We educate on fire safety and disaster preparedness year-round so by the time an emergency does occur, people are ready to implement their plan with their family.What are the biggest misperceptions people have about wildfires?There are three big misconceptions that people have about wildfires.First: that fires happen to others and won’t happen to them.Second: there is a belief that if I don’t live on a rim of a canyon or edge of open space, I’m not in danger of being impacted by fire.Third: that wildfires are a public safety issue – fires are a community issue. Wildland fire affects everyone and everyone in the community is a stakeholder. It’s important to understand what it means to be able to “live with fire.”Everything necessary to plan and prepare for a wildfire is available on the OCFA website. The “Ready, Set, Go” material on the site provides homeowners with all the information needed to be prepared, from home escape plan templates, to easy-to-follow checklists to ensure you and your family are prepared. Firefighters from Orange County fire safety agencies hike up a hill with full wildfire fighting gear during a wildfire training session at Santiago Oaks Regional Park in 2015. File photo by Steven Georges/Behind the Badge That said, waiting to receive a warning is not prudent when you are aware that fire(s) are burning nearby. It’s everyone’s responsibility to stay alert. Turn on the local news, go outside and see if you see or smell smoke, go online, call friends and family. In short, one must take responsibility for remaining aware.Law enforcement and the fire service will do all they can to alert communities, but residents should not wait to be told to evacuate if at all concerned.Why is fire safety and readiness education important?Readiness education is essential because you never know when disaster can strike. Statistics show in the event of an emergency, survival and success favor those who are prepared. This can apply to any emergency, whether it’s a residential structure fire, large wildfire, earthquakes, or even a pandemic.When emergencies do occur, people often have a sense of panic with emotions and adrenaline levels running high – this is NOT the time to come up with a plan. We educate on fire safety and disaster preparedness year-round so by the time an emergency does occur, people are ready to implement their plan with their family.What are the biggest misperceptions people have about wildfires?There are three big misconceptions that people have about wildfires.First: that fires happen to others and won’t happen to them.Second: there is a belief that if I don’t live on a rim of a canyon or edge of open space, I’m not in danger of being impacted by fire.Third: that wildfires are a public safety issue – fires are a community issue. Wildland fire affects everyone and everyone in the community is a stakeholder. It’s important to understand what it means to be able to “live with fire.”Everything necessary to plan and prepare for a wildfire is available on the OCFA website. The “Ready, Set, Go” material on the site provides homeowners with all the information needed to be prepared, from home escape plan templates, to easy-to-follow checklists to ensure you and your family are prepared. Firefighters from Orange County fire safety agencies hike up a hill with full wildfire fighting gear during a wildfire training session at Santiago Oaks Regional Park in 2015. File photo by Steven Georges/Behind the Badge If you had one message, what would it be? If you had one message, what would it be?

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