Standard Operating Procedures Template Word Free

Thursday, October 21st 2021. | Sample Templates

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Editing papers: Word for Linguists Introduction Editing papers: Word for Linguists Introduction This is a guide for people who use Microsoft Word to write papers in linguistics. It includes some discussion of general features of Word (such as templates and styles) and some features common to academic writing (such as cross-references and typography), but the focus is on issues of specific interest to linguists (such as special characters and interlinear glossing). Some familiarity with Word is assumed. This is a guide for people who use Microsoft Word to write papers in linguistics. It includes some discussion of general features of Word (such as templates and styles) and some features common to academic writing (such as cross-references and typography), but the focus is on issues of specific interest to linguists (such as special characters and interlinear glossing). Some familiarity with Word is assumed. This version of Word for Linguists applies to Word 2013. Most features discussed here also apply to earlier versions, as well as to Word 365. However, menu layouts change from version to version. If you can’t find something, check other menus or look in the help system. This version of Word for Linguists applies to Word 2013. Most features discussed here also apply to earlier versions, as well as to Word 365. However, menu layouts change from version to version. If you can’t find something, check other menus or look in the help system. Lingword.dotx (or Lingword.dot for older versions of Word) is a template you can download that contains macros which automate some of the procedures described in this document. More information on how to use it under Templates, below, and in the .dotx document itself. Some general tips Lingword.dotx (or Lingword.dot for older versions of Word) is a template you can download that contains macros which automate some of the procedures described in this document. More information on how to use it under Templates, below, and in the .dotx document itself. Some general tips Word is highly customizable. If there’s anything you don’t like about the way the program works, it is very likely possible to change it. And if there’s a feature you want but can’t find, it’s almost certainly there, somewhere. Unfortunately the documentation provided with current versions of Word is quite inadequate; the online documentation is better, but it can be hard to find the information you want if you don’t know the terminology used by the program. For anyone who wants information about the program beyond what’s covered here, and for more detailed information about some of the features I do discuss, I’d recommend buying a good third-party book. A useful place online to get answers to Word (and other Microsoft Office) questions is Woody’s Lounge. It’s a forum — first use the search feature to see if your question has already been answered, and if not, post the question on the forum. There are lots of knowledgeable people there.   Word is highly customizable. If there’s anything you don’t like about the way the program works, it is very likely possible to change it. And if there’s a feature you want but can’t find, it’s almost certainly there, somewhere. Unfortunately the documentation provided with current versions of Word is quite inadequate; the online documentation is better, but it can be hard to find the information you want if you don’t know the terminology used by the program. For anyone who wants information about the program beyond what’s covered here, and for more detailed information about some of the features I do discuss, I’d recommend buying a good third-party book. A useful place online to get answers to Word (and other Microsoft Office) questions is Woody’s Lounge. It’s a forum — first use the search feature to see if your question has already been answered, and if not, post the question on the forum. There are lots of knowledgeable people there.   A good strategy to use in getting to know Word (and other modern software) is to explore the menus thoroughly, and experiment until you know what everything does. Even out of the box and uncustomized, Word provides many different ways to invoke its commands. All common operations can be invoked three or four different ways: via a drop-down menu, a pop-up (right-click) menu, a keystroke combination, and a mouse-click combination. When giving instructions in this document, I indicate the methods I most commonly use. Different users have different preferences, however, so you’re encouraged to use the help system to explore your alternatives. If you’re a keyboard fan, you’re especially encouraged to visit the help topic called “keyboard shortcuts”. Acknowledgments A good strategy to use in getting to know Word (and other modern software) is to explore the menus thoroughly, and experiment until you know what everything does. Even out of the box and uncustomized, Word provides many different ways to invoke its commands. All common operations can be invoked three or four different ways: via a drop-down menu, a pop-up (right-click) menu, a keystroke combination, and a mouse-click combination. When giving instructions in this document, I indicate the methods I most commonly use. Different users have different preferences, however, so you’re encouraged to use the help system to explore your alternatives. If you’re a keyboard fan, you’re especially encouraged to visit the help topic called “keyboard shortcuts”. Acknowledgments This page is inspired by one created by Susanna Cumming at UC Santa Barbara, and the LingWord template is hers (LingWord.dot for older versions of Word). Unfortunately, the page disappeared a few years ago. This version was recreated by Maite Taboada and Mara Katz. Other excellent resources for linguists exist: This page is inspired by one created by Susanna Cumming at UC Santa Barbara, and the LingWord template is hers (LingWord.dot for older versions of Word). Unfortunately, the page disappeared a few years ago. This version was recreated by Maite Taboada and Mara Katz. Other excellent resources for linguists exist: Send any comments or suggestions to Maite Taboada. Annotation and Collaboration Tools Send any comments or suggestions to Maite Taboada. Annotation and Collaboration Tools As a linguist, you will probably be working with other people on a document. Word includes tools for annotation that are more legible and easier to email than scribbling in the margins of an essay. Comments added using these tools can “point” directly to items in the text, and can be automatically incorporated into the document or removed altogether. These tools are accessible from the Review toolbar in Windows 2013. Comments As a linguist, you will probably be working with other people on a document. Word includes tools for annotation that are more legible and easier to email than scribbling in the margins of an essay. Comments added using these tools can “point” directly to items in the text, and can be automatically incorporated into the document or removed altogether. These tools are accessible from the Review toolbar in Windows 2013. Comments To add a comment, highlight a block of text with the cursor, then click “New Comment” in the Review toolbar. A bubble will appear in the right margin in which you can type your comment. This bubble is linked to the text you highlighted, so you can respond directly to a part of the text. Track Changes To add a comment, highlight a block of text with the cursor, then click “New Comment” in the Review toolbar. A bubble will appear in the right margin in which you can type your comment. This bubble is linked to the text you highlighted, so you can respond directly to a part of the text. Track Changes

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