Superhero Logo Template

Tuesday, January 28th 2020. | Sample Templates

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Jane McGonigal: Game on with ‘SuperBetter’ Jane McGonigal: Game on with ‘SuperBetter’ Jane the Concussion Killer ended her battle against evil years ago, but See Jane Run is still vanquishing foes. Jane the Concussion Killer ended her battle against evil years ago, but See Jane Run is still vanquishing foes. Both are the alter egos of video game advocate Jane McGonigal, whose slow recovery from a head injury was inspiration to turn wellness into a hero-themed game called “SuperBetter.” With the concussion symptoms gone and migraines held at bay, McGonigal has resumed running. She’s pursuing video-game-style achievements and eventually an “epic win,” which should come later this year when she completes the last in a series of half marathons. Both are the alter egos of video game advocate Jane McGonigal, whose slow recovery from a head injury was inspiration to turn wellness into a hero-themed game called “SuperBetter.” With the concussion symptoms gone and migraines held at bay, McGonigal has resumed running. She’s pursuing video-game-style achievements and eventually an “epic win,” which should come later this year when she completes the last in a series of half marathons. The San Francisco author and game researcher is taking “SuperBetter” global this month, as a free online game and app that launches on Friday. With partners, funding and a network of users who have already signed up, she’s hoping “SuperBetter” can help people on their own heroic journeys to tackle depression, obesity and other health issues. The San Francisco author and game researcher is taking “SuperBetter” global this month, as a free online game and app that launches on Friday. With partners, funding and a network of users who have already signed up, she’s hoping “SuperBetter” can help people on their own heroic journeys to tackle depression, obesity and other health issues. ” ‘SuperBetter’ is fundamentally about a mind shift,” McGonigal says. “It’s about claiming your power to be in charge of how you spend your time and energy, and focusing it on the things that matter the most to you. Focusing on things that will bring real happiness, real well-being.” ” ‘SuperBetter’ is fundamentally about a mind shift,” McGonigal says. “It’s about claiming your power to be in charge of how you spend your time and energy, and focusing it on the things that matter the most to you. Focusing on things that will bring real happiness, real well-being.” And if that means coming up with a tough-sounding superhero name and recruiting your friends and family as sidekicks? Just part of the fun. And if that means coming up with a tough-sounding superhero name and recruiting your friends and family as sidekicks? Just part of the fun. Fun and games seem to follow McGonigal wherever she goes. Her hair is a blond fountain of curls, and she has little use for muted colors. She comes to her Chronicle photo shoot wearing a printed silk Leifsdottir dress and new sparkly green and gold Miu Miu earrings – which match the lightning bolts of the “SuperBetter” logo. Fun and games seem to follow McGonigal wherever she goes. Her hair is a blond fountain of curls, and she has little use for muted colors. She comes to her Chronicle photo shoot wearing a printed silk Leifsdottir dress and new sparkly green and gold Miu Miu earrings – which match the lightning bolts of the “SuperBetter” logo. McGonigal, 34, says her fearless fashion sense comes from video games, which she’s been playing since she was a child growing up in New Jersey. Her parents were schoolteachers who encouraged reading and following her passions, which included writing and creating programs on a Commodore 64. As a doctoral candidate at UC Berkeley in the early 2000s, she felt the need to look “serious.” But she quickly realized that in her area of expertise, it’s OK to come as you are. McGonigal, 34, says her fearless fashion sense comes from video games, which she’s been playing since she was a child growing up in New Jersey. Her parents were schoolteachers who encouraged reading and following her passions, which included writing and creating programs on a Commodore 64. As a doctoral candidate at UC Berkeley in the early 2000s, she felt the need to look “serious.” But she quickly realized that in her area of expertise, it’s OK to come as you are. “I remember the first year at the Game Developers Conference I wore these big red giant knee-high boots,” McGonigal says. “Nobody cared. You can wear anything you love, because that’s what you do in games. You make yourself who you want to be.” “I remember the first year at the Game Developers Conference I wore these big red giant knee-high boots,” McGonigal says. “Nobody cared. You can wear anything you love, because that’s what you do in games. You make yourself who you want to be.” She was an advocate for the concept of “gamification” – using games to solve real-world challenges – then became a public face with her 2011 best-seller “Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World” (Penguin Press). McGonigal’s ease in addressing non-gaming audiences (Google her memorable 2011 appearance on “The Colbert Report”) made her bold statements easier to take seriously. Among other theories, McGonigal thinks we’re going to see a game designer or researcher win the Nobel Prize. She was an advocate for the concept of “gamification” – using games to solve real-world challenges – then became a public face with her 2011 best-seller “Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World” (Penguin Press). McGonigal’s ease in addressing non-gaming audiences (Google her memorable 2011 appearance on “The Colbert Report”) made her bold statements easier to take seriously. Among other theories, McGonigal thinks we’re going to see a game designer or researcher win the Nobel Prize.

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