Times Interest Earned Ratio formula

Saturday, April 18th 2020. | Sample Templates

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10 Things Every First-Time Investor Should Know 10 Things Every First-Time Investor Should Know Before I start the show. Here’s a quick word from our sponsor, where does fine art meet the art of sausage racing, where to good times flow, whether you’re on a river or in a craft brewery in Milwaukee where unique unites this fall, head to the fresh coast to indulgent food baseball and the brand new totally free brew city beer pass. It gives you buy one, get one offers at participating craft breweries, go to visit milwaukee.org/beer pass and start looking forward to Milwaukee. Before I start the show. Here’s a quick word from our sponsor, where does fine art meet the art of sausage racing, where to good times flow, whether you’re on a river or in a craft brewery in Milwaukee where unique unites this fall, head to the fresh coast to indulgent food baseball and the brand new totally free brew city beer pass. It gives you buy one, get one offers at participating craft breweries, go to visit milwaukee.org/beer pass and start looking forward to Milwaukee. If you’re like most people, you know, investing money as a smart idea. But if you haven’t gotten started because you think investing is too complicated or risky, it’s time to learn how to invest without taking too much risk. This podcast we’ll cover why it’s essential to start investing as soon as possible and the different types of investments to choose from. We’re going to cover how you can create the best investment strategy based on your financial situation, your age, and your risk tolerance. Hello friends. And thanks for joining me this week. My name is Laura Adams and I’m a personal finance and small business expert and author. Who’s been hosting the money girl podcast since 2008. My mission is to help you get the knowledge and motivation to prioritize your finances, build wealth, and have more security and less stress. I create every show to make sure you come away with practical advice that helps you make better money decisions and takes your financial life to the next level. If you’re like most people, you know, investing money as a smart idea. But if you haven’t gotten started because you think investing is too complicated or risky, it’s time to learn how to invest without taking too much risk. This podcast we’ll cover why it’s essential to start investing as soon as possible and the different types of investments to choose from. We’re going to cover how you can create the best investment strategy based on your financial situation, your age, and your risk tolerance. Hello friends. And thanks for joining me this week. My name is Laura Adams and I’m a personal finance and small business expert and author. Who’s been hosting the money girl podcast since 2008. My mission is to help you get the knowledge and motivation to prioritize your finances, build wealth, and have more security and less stress. I create every show to make sure you come away with practical advice that helps you make better money decisions and takes your financial life to the next level. Be sure to subscribe to the show and participate by sending me your money, questions or comments. You can leave a voice message. 24 7 at 3 0 2 3 6 4 0 3 0 8. You can also email me using my contactPage@lauradadams.com. Or you can connect with me on Instagram at Laura D. Adams. And if you want to read a companion blog post for this show or any episode, they’re always published in the money girl section@quickanddirtytips.com, just look forward today’s episode, which is number 697 called 10 things. Every successful first-time or seasoned investor should know. I get a lot of questions about investing. And I think one of the main points of confusion is when it’s a good time for you to invest, you know, when is it appropriate for you to use your financial resources for investing versus for other financial goals that you may have? And then when people start investing, they’re really confused about, you know, which investments should I pick? Be sure to subscribe to the show and participate by sending me your money, questions or comments. You can leave a voice message. 24 7 at 3 0 2 3 6 4 0 3 0 8. You can also email me using my contactPage@lauradadams.com. Or you can connect with me on Instagram at Laura D. Adams. And if you want to read a companion blog post for this show or any episode, they’re always published in the money girl section@quickanddirtytips.com, just look forward today’s episode, which is number 697 called 10 things. Every successful first-time or seasoned investor should know. I get a lot of questions about investing. And I think one of the main points of confusion is when it’s a good time for you to invest, you know, when is it appropriate for you to use your financial resources for investing versus for other financial goals that you may have? And then when people start investing, they’re really confused about, you know, which investments should I pick? What’s the right type of investment for me. Should I be using a brokerage account or should I be using a tax advantage account? So we’re going to cover all of that in this show. And we’re going to go through 10 things that every investor should know. And the first one is pretty basic, but it is saving and investing are for different financial goals. So let’s back up a little bit before we get into what to know about investing. It’s really important to clarify that saving and investing are not the same. We kind of use those terms interchangeably quite often, but I want to differentiate them here for you. Saving is putting money into a safe, low yield account. That could be a bank savings account, a money market account, or even a certificate of deposit or CD so that you preserve the money saving is the right move. What’s the right type of investment for me. Should I be using a brokerage account or should I be using a tax advantage account? So we’re going to cover all of that in this show. And we’re going to go through 10 things that every investor should know. And the first one is pretty basic, but it is saving and investing are for different financial goals. So let’s back up a little bit before we get into what to know about investing. It’s really important to clarify that saving and investing are not the same. We kind of use those terms interchangeably quite often, but I want to differentiate them here for you. Saving is putting money into a safe, low yield account. That could be a bank savings account, a money market account, or even a certificate of deposit or CD so that you preserve the money saving is the right move. When you’ve got short term goals, they could be buying a car next year or taking a vacation within a year or two. It’s also appropriate for your emergency fund because it keeps your money completely safe with savings. You know, that cash will be there when you need it. There’s just no chance that it’s going to lose money. Now it may not gain much money either. It may not earn much interest and that’s fine because saving is about again, preserving money now, investing this is very different because it’s the right strategy only for your longer term goals that you want to achieve. And at least, you know, I’d say three to five years and these goals might include buying a home, paying for a child’s college. And of course, retiring with investing. You put money into financial instruments, it could be stocks, bonds, mutual funds with the expectation of getting future growth and investing is not appropriate for your short term goals. When you’ve got short term goals, they could be buying a car next year or taking a vacation within a year or two. It’s also appropriate for your emergency fund because it keeps your money completely safe with savings. You know, that cash will be there when you need it. There’s just no chance that it’s going to lose money. Now it may not gain much money either. It may not earn much interest and that’s fine because saving is about again, preserving money now, investing this is very different because it’s the right strategy only for your longer term goals that you want to achieve. And at least, you know, I’d say three to five years and these goals might include buying a home, paying for a child’s college. And of course, retiring with investing. You put money into financial instruments, it could be stocks, bonds, mutual funds with the expectation of getting future growth and investing is not appropriate for your short term goals. In other words, you should never invest your emergency money because market values can fluctuate wildly within short periods, and you run the danger of needing to use that money at the point that the value plummets. So investing requires some amount of risk, but without it, you are not going to earn the types of returns and the growth that you need to achieve. Significant financial goals, such as retiring. A really good rule of thumb is to always invest a minimum of 10 to 15% of your gross income for retirement year in and year out. All right? The second thing that you should know is that you need to have financial safety nets before investing. So while I’m always going to encourage you to begin investing as soon as possible everyone’s situation is different. So first, if you’ve got any dangerous deaths, these might include overdue taxes for your federal or state returns, overdue child support, or any accounts that are in collections. In other words, you should never invest your emergency money because market values can fluctuate wildly within short periods, and you run the danger of needing to use that money at the point that the value plummets. So investing requires some amount of risk, but without it, you are not going to earn the types of returns and the growth that you need to achieve. Significant financial goals, such as retiring. A really good rule of thumb is to always invest a minimum of 10 to 15% of your gross income for retirement year in and year out. All right? The second thing that you should know is that you need to have financial safety nets before investing. So while I’m always going to encourage you to begin investing as soon as possible everyone’s situation is different. So first, if you’ve got any dangerous deaths, these might include overdue taxes for your federal or state returns, overdue child support, or any accounts that are in collections. You need to address those before you use your money to invest. If you don’t address these dangerous deaths, they can really cause you a lot of financial misery down the road. Additionally, if you’ve got high interest credit card debt, I’d like you to consider paying it off as soon as possible by doing that, you’re going to get an instant rate of return by eliminating the monthly interest expense. So for instance, if you’ve got a credit card that’s charging you 25% APR, that means by paying that debt off, you have an instant guaranteed return of 25% and that’s after taxes. So the return for paying off credit card debt in a lot of cases is much higher than the return that you can get for investing. So again, if you’ve got high interest cards, uh, you may want to consider tackling them just depending on, you know, what the debt is, how much debt you’ve got and what the interest rate is. You need to address those before you use your money to invest. If you don’t address these dangerous deaths, they can really cause you a lot of financial misery down the road. Additionally, if you’ve got high interest credit card debt, I’d like you to consider paying it off as soon as possible by doing that, you’re going to get an instant rate of return by eliminating the monthly interest expense. So for instance, if you’ve got a credit card that’s charging you 25% APR, that means by paying that debt off, you have an instant guaranteed return of 25% and that’s after taxes. So the return for paying off credit card debt in a lot of cases is much higher than the return that you can get for investing. So again, if you’ve got high interest cards, uh, you may want to consider tackling them just depending on, you know, what the debt is, how much debt you’ve got and what the interest rate is. I mentioned savings. And so that’s a critical financial safety net that you also need to have before investing money, maintaining a cash reserve will help you just manage things that come up in life, unexpected expenses and hardships, like losing your job, having a big home repair bill or a medical bill, a good savings target is three to six months worth of your living expenses. And so when I talk about living expenses, these are the necessities, housing, food utilities, and those debt payments that you’re making. So here’s an example. If your living expenses total $3,500 each month make a goal to build up a minimum of 10,500 in savings. Remember that stowing money in a savings account is only acceptable for your short-term goals and your emergency fund, and it’s not appropriate for your longer term financial goals. Before you put money into investments. Another safety net you need is specific insurance policies like health insurance, making even a quick trip to the emergency room for an illness or an accident could really set you back. I mentioned savings. And so that’s a critical financial safety net that you also need to have before investing money, maintaining a cash reserve will help you just manage things that come up in life, unexpected expenses and hardships, like losing your job, having a big home repair bill or a medical bill, a good savings target is three to six months worth of your living expenses. And so when I talk about living expenses, these are the necessities, housing, food utilities, and those debt payments that you’re making. So here’s an example. If your living expenses total $3,500 each month make a goal to build up a minimum of 10,500 in savings. Remember that stowing money in a savings account is only acceptable for your short-term goals and your emergency fund, and it’s not appropriate for your longer term financial goals. Before you put money into investments. Another safety net you need is specific insurance policies like health insurance, making even a quick trip to the emergency room for an illness or an accident could really set you back. It could cost many thousands of dollars. So without insurance, you really are putting everything that you’re working toward at risk. And while mortgage lenders require you to have home insurance, most renters don’t buy renter’s insurance. So if you are a renter, I would encourage you to get a renter’s policy. It’s an inexpensive policy and it protects your belongings and your liability and other things as well. And it makes it very worth the average annual cost of $185 a year nationwide. So for an average cost of $185 per year, a renter’s policy gives you a lot of financial protection. So I would encourage you to get that before you start investing. And lastly, if you have family members who depend on your income, you also need life insurance to protect their financial futures, getting a 10 or 20 year term life insurance policy for let’s say half a million dollars may cost less than $300 a year if you’re in relatively good health. It could cost many thousands of dollars. So without insurance, you really are putting everything that you’re working toward at risk. And while mortgage lenders require you to have home insurance, most renters don’t buy renter’s insurance. So if you are a renter, I would encourage you to get a renter’s policy. It’s an inexpensive policy and it protects your belongings and your liability and other things as well. And it makes it very worth the average annual cost of $185 a year nationwide. So for an average cost of $185 per year, a renter’s policy gives you a lot of financial protection. So I would encourage you to get that before you start investing. And lastly, if you have family members who depend on your income, you also need life insurance to protect their financial futures, getting a 10 or 20 year term life insurance policy for let’s say half a million dollars may cost less than $300 a year if you’re in relatively good health.

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