Two Face Coloring Pages

Monday, March 30th 2020. | Sample Templates

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Kayla Mahaffey: Chicago Hope

  Kayla Mahaffey: Chicago Hope

  What’s your method? Do you sketch out figures first, and do you have something definite in mind when you start? What’s your method? Do you sketch out figures first, and do you have something definite in mind when you start? When I come up with an idea, I usually start with a quick sketch or thumbnail to get a good feel. It’s rare that I change the set up once it’s sketched out, but sometimes this happens, I just move the figures around a bit and see how best to keep the composition balanced and visually pleasing. Ideas usually emerge out of the blue, and I will jot the description down in my notes or I’ll draw a quick thumbnail with the elements I want to feature. Color choices happen pretty sporadically at first. Once I get the child figures painted with certain hues, I start filling the background with colors at random. Then I reel the colors back in and try to find a common color scheme to balance out the palette for uniformity, followed by small tweaks here and there by adding more details, like freckles on a child’s face, or the little cloud bubble pieces that appear in almost all of my paintings.  When I come up with an idea, I usually start with a quick sketch or thumbnail to get a good feel. It’s rare that I change the set up once it’s sketched out, but sometimes this happens, I just move the figures around a bit and see how best to keep the composition balanced and visually pleasing. Ideas usually emerge out of the blue, and I will jot the description down in my notes or I’ll draw a quick thumbnail with the elements I want to feature. Color choices happen pretty sporadically at first. Once I get the child figures painted with certain hues, I start filling the background with colors at random. Then I reel the colors back in and try to find a common color scheme to balance out the palette for uniformity, followed by small tweaks here and there by adding more details, like freckles on a child’s face, or the little cloud bubble pieces that appear in almost all of my paintings.  Do you have a routine, and did it change as a result of Covid? What do you need to create your best studio experience?  Do you have a routine, and did it change as a result of Covid? What do you need to create your best studio experience?  I have a routine, but Covid didn’t really disrupt it. I work from home and think of myself as more of a homebody; with the pandemic, my daily events barely changed. I wake up, eat breakfast, shower, get groceries once a week, paint, exercise, and repeat. I occasionally go out with friends and family, and that came to a halt; but other than that, they were pretty normal days. When I paint, I always need my two big cups of water for brush cleaning and dilution, some background music (whatever I’m feeling that day) or podcasts, and some tea and/or water to hydrate, along with some granola, nuts, or gummy candy nearby. My needs are pretty simple, especially if the painting is going well.  I have a routine, but Covid didn’t really disrupt it. I work from home and think of myself as more of a homebody; with the pandemic, my daily events barely changed. I wake up, eat breakfast, shower, get groceries once a week, paint, exercise, and repeat. I occasionally go out with friends and family, and that came to a halt; but other than that, they were pretty normal days. When I paint, I always need my two big cups of water for brush cleaning and dilution, some background music (whatever I’m feeling that day) or podcasts, and some tea and/or water to hydrate, along with some granola, nuts, or gummy candy nearby. My needs are pretty simple, especially if the painting is going well.  A mural is a whole other experience, so did you feel any hesitation at first? What was the process like in terms of materials, methods and time? A mural is a whole other experience, so did you feel any hesitation at first? What was the process like in terms of materials, methods and time? My first mural was pretty small compared to those I painted later. It was only about 10ft tall and 8ft wide and was done on the side section of a thrift store. Looking back, I was kind of nervous to paint something that size. “What if I don’t finish in time,” or, “What if I run out of paint?” I asked myself tons of questions I would never think about ordinarily. I had to take into consideration supplies and use tools like paint rollers, ladders, and spray paint, which I normally didn’t use. Once started, the process was fairly easy, basically painting a huge painting, and when I got midway done, I saw that I actually brought too much paint, which never happens on bigger mural sites now. After two days of painting and only eight hours of work total, I was proud of what I accomplished in a timely fashion, but I didn’t take into account the physical exhaustion—and the weather. My body ached so badly the next day, I felt like I ran a marathon. I take that knowledge with me on every project now and prepare for the physical undertaking. The weather can be an issue, especially if you’re still painting and rain decides to appear, or the heat is so scorching you end up taking more breaks and drinking water so you end up painting way less, making the mural process more time consuming. For my first, I experienced both. The first day was humid and the sun was blazing and the second day of painting brought out the rain, which made me have to stop and wait till it let up. Nonetheless, a very exciting experience taught me a lot of tips and tricks that I use with the murals I do today. My first mural was pretty small compared to those I painted later. It was only about 10ft tall and 8ft wide and was done on the side section of a thrift store. Looking back, I was kind of nervous to paint something that size. “What if I don’t finish in time,” or, “What if I run out of paint?” I asked myself tons of questions I would never think about ordinarily. I had to take into consideration supplies and use tools like paint rollers, ladders, and spray paint, which I normally didn’t use. Once started, the process was fairly easy, basically painting a huge painting, and when I got midway done, I saw that I actually brought too much paint, which never happens on bigger mural sites now. After two days of painting and only eight hours of work total, I was proud of what I accomplished in a timely fashion, but I didn’t take into account the physical exhaustion—and the weather. My body ached so badly the next day, I felt like I ran a marathon. I take that knowledge with me on every project now and prepare for the physical undertaking. The weather can be an issue, especially if you’re still painting and rain decides to appear, or the heat is so scorching you end up taking more breaks and drinking water so you end up painting way less, making the mural process more time consuming. For my first, I experienced both. The first day was humid and the sun was blazing and the second day of painting brought out the rain, which made me have to stop and wait till it let up. Nonetheless, a very exciting experience taught me a lot of tips and tricks that I use with the murals I do today. It’s impossible to separate you from Chicago. Did you grow up in the same home, the same neighborhood? I can tell a real loyalty to the city, especially the South Side. It’s impossible to separate you from Chicago. Did you grow up in the same home, the same neighborhood? I can tell a real loyalty to the city, especially the South Side. Chicago is such a special place. While it has its problems, it is and will always be my home. I’ve moved around a few times with my family, and jumped to different neighborhoods, but we always found ourselves on the South Side. From Roseland to Auburn Gresham, to Chatham to a few more neighborhoods that, while still on the South Side, contained their own flair. It’s not necessarily a loyalty, but more of a part of my identity. Everyone’s experiences vary dramatically by where they grew up, and Chicago has shaped me and those who live here in a significant way. The nostalgia and cultural significance are instilled into my memories as I grow older. There is a certain type of humility and resilience to the people who grow up here… and of course the food is amazing. It has a spirit that can’t be really described in words, but is experienced in the people who love living here. If I ever moved somewhere else, I would miss those two things the most. I love seeing new things and traveling to new places and, who knows, I don’t know where I’ll end up moving in the future, if I ever do, but Chicago will always hold a special place in my heart.  Chicago is such a special place. While it has its problems, it is and will always be my home. I’ve moved around a few times with my family, and jumped to different neighborhoods, but we always found ourselves on the South Side. From Roseland to Auburn Gresham, to Chatham to a few more neighborhoods that, while still on the South Side, contained their own flair. It’s not necessarily a loyalty, but more of a part of my identity. Everyone’s experiences vary dramatically by where they grew up, and Chicago has shaped me and those who live here in a significant way. The nostalgia and cultural significance are instilled into my memories as I grow older. There is a certain type of humility and resilience to the people who grow up here… and of course the food is amazing. It has a spirit that can’t be really described in words, but is experienced in the people who love living here. If I ever moved somewhere else, I would miss those two things the most. I love seeing new things and traveling to new places and, who knows, I don’t know where I’ll end up moving in the future, if I ever do, but Chicago will always hold a special place in my heart.  Kayla Mahaffey’s solo show, Remember the Time, will be on view at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles through October 9, 2021 Kayla Mahaffey’s solo show, Remember the Time, will be on view at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles through October 9, 2021

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